Welcome to this week’s installment of Geek Girl Authority Crush of the Week, wherein we shine a spotlight on strong women who inspire us. This not only includes fictional female characters in geeky media but creators as well. These ladies are a prime example of female empowerment and how crucial it is for young girls to have said example to follow.

DISCLAIMER: The following is rife with spoilers galore for SyFy’s cult favorite Battlestar Galactica. If you’re not caught up on this brilliant series, you may want to remedy that now. You’ve been warned. 

Laura Roslin 

Fast Facts:

Pictured: Mary McDonnell as President Laura Roslin

 

Laura Roslin (portrayed by Mary McDonnell) was the Secretary of Education for the United Colonies of Kobol prior to its fall at the hands of Cylons. She lost her immediate family before her presidency – most notably her mother, who passed from cancer. Roslin herself was diagnosed with terminal cancer the day of the Cylon attack. However, post-Cylon attack, Roslin was sworn in as President of the Twelve Colonies. She was the highest-ranked government official that survived. Despite not snagging the presidential role via proper elections, Roslin served two terms. 

Later, it was believed that Roslin represented the religious aspect of a Pythian prophecy. It prophesied that a dying leader would bring her people to a promised land. However, she would not live to see it. Roslin did live to see the Colonial Fleet locate Earth, the 13th colony of Kobol. She eventually moved to a remote location on Earth with her beau Commander William Adama (Edward James Olmos). Roslin passed on soon after the planet’s discovery.  

The Real Deal:

Now, Roslin is the real deal. She’s a president, for starters. A woman in charge of the broken and battered United Colonies of Kobol, yes, but a president nonetheless. Despite her terminal illness, she still shouldered the burden of leading her citizens with immense courage. Roslin did not allow her suffering to affect her ability to lead. I cannot imagine being under such public scrutiny while attempting to govern a nation. Roslin handled it all with aplomb and grace.

In addition, Roslin never shied away from making tough decisions. She knew she served her people, and always put them first. Roslin is highly intelligent, which is evident from her days serving as Secretary of Education. Not to mention, she is good-natured, but never allowed others to take advantage of her. Roslin is also resilient – she never gave her cancer the upper hand while in office. 

Why She Matters:

Pictured: Mary McDonnell

Alright, why does she matter? President Laura Roslin is the very definition of female empowerment. She encapsulates why we at Geek Girl Authority love to highlight strong women. Roslin is an example for girls everywhere – proof positive that a woman can be president. Women can govern. Women can hold positions of power and execute their duties to the best of their abilities. And then some. 

Not to mention, Roslin is a fighter. She fought tooth and nail against cancer, and lived long enough to prove the Pythian prophecy wrong. Roslin reminds us that we humans are resilient creatures. She represents the terminal illness warriors that surround us day to day. 

So, be like President Laura Roslin. Make the tough decisions that others would shy away from. Be kind, but never allow those around you to take advantage. Fight, even when you feel like surrendering. Boldly lead when called upon. Pick yourself up and march through the fray. Oh, and glasses are always in. Four-eyed chic for the win. 

RELATED: Looking for another strong female crush? Check out our Geek Girl Authority Crushes of the Week here!

RELATED: BATTLESTAR GALACTICA: My Top 10 Favorite Episodes 

 

 

Melody McCune

Before moving to Los Angeles after studying theater in college, I was born and raised in Amish country, Ohio. No, I am not Amish, even if I sometimes sport a modest bonnet. I also work publicity for WhedonCon, a convention celebrating the works of Joss Whedon. I love cheese. I love geek. I love lamp.

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