There’s a plethora of webcomics to toil away your time reading on the Internet. From sites like Smackjeeves to Tapastic, there’s a huge array of comics to fit any and all genres that you might like. There’s going to be something that sticks out for any comic lover and make a great story to keep up with as the comics go on. Here are four webcomics that are worth checking out, in no particular order, because of their humor, story, character or art. Or a nice combo of all four!

1. Check, Please! by Ngozi Ukazu

Check, Please! is a webcomic that follows Eric “Bitty” Bittle, a former ice skater turned hockey player as he makes his way through 4 years of college. Started in 2013, Check, Please! has pulled in a huge fan base online with it’s (usually) monthly updates. I found the webcomic through the recommendations of some friends and it’s worth a read! As the synopsis says, Check, Please! is “a story about hockey and friendship and bros and trying to find yourself during the best 4 years of your life.”

With an interesting cast of characters (with names like Shitty, Lardo and Bitty), introductions to hockey culture, and the typical and not so typical bro-culture, Check, Please! is entertaining and keeps me coming back with each update. 

One thing that I really love about the series is the incorporation of vlogging, social media interactions and the relationship that develops between all of the characters. Each episode opens with Bitty vlogging about all that’s been happening. I really love stories that actually show how high school/college students are, and vlogging is definitely something that is really rooted in our lives right now.

If that hasn’t convinced you, Ukazu even started a Twitter account for Bitty where she posts in between updates of the comic, further adding to the story of Check, Please!. So besides the comic itself, there is plenty of other content to take in!

 

2. Sarah’s Scribbles by Sarah Anderson

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Sarah’s Scribbles is a life/personal comic started by Sarah Anderson. The comics have grown really popular through Facebook and Tumblr, being shared by thousands of people. If you haven’t heard of it already, a lot of the comics deal with being an adult and just getting through the day.

Anderson’s first book, “Adulthood is a Myth”, sums up the comics pretty well. They cover anything from growing older to the anxiety that comes with being an adult. With a sense of witty humor to it.

I honestly relate to about 99% of the Sarah’s Scribbles comics, and I think that says a lot about how appealing and funny they are. They manage to poke fun at things in life that can be downright difficult in an open way that most people will be able to get. The comics are short and to the point, but leave a good lasting feeling.

 

 

3. Owlturd Comix by Shenanigansen

Owlturd Comix is told through a self-insert character called Shen. I think the best way to describe Owlturd is what all people feel but in comic format. You have that internal screaming that just can’t come out? There’s an Owlturd comic for that.

The comics are usually stand alone shorts that have on-point punchlines that vary from negative emotions to trying to eat healthy. Really relatable topics that everyone can enjoy to in a whimsical art style reminiscent of Nintendo Mii’s.

 

 

4. 4-Panel-Life by Jen-Jen-Rose

4-panel Life

4-Panel-Life is a daily journal comic that author Jen-Jen-Rose started as a way to keep in contact with her friends more. They managed to convince her to take it public, resulting in one of my personal Top 5 webcomics. 

You might have noticed a slight trend in these recommendations, that most of them are ongoing comics where each new comic can stand on its own. I think in general these are so appealing because of that. 4-Panel-Life is no exception. It takes moments from Jen-Jen-Rose’s life and puts them in a (you guessed it) 4 panel comic. Ranging from cosplay shame, to glasses fails, to overhearing really weird conversations on public transport, 4-Panel-Life is funny and delivers the author’s experiences in a really cute style.

 

 

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